New England Gold Prospecting and Panning Locations,

GOLD IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

Gold has been and continues to be found in small quantities in some of the state’s bedrock (the solid rock under the soil) and in the gravel at the bottom of some streams (as placer deposits). When gold is found in the bedrock, it usually occurs in veins, long, narrow mineral rich “streaks. ” It is removed by breaking up the rock and removing the gold.

These hard rock mining techniques have been done here in the past. Gold was discovered in Lyman, N.H., in 1864, sparking a minor rush. Several small mines soon opened in the Bath, N. H. area. These small mines supported two milling operations. About $50,000 worth of gold (at period value) was shipped to the Philadelphia National Mint before economic circumstances closed operations in 1878. A much smaller amount of gold was also shipped to the mint from the Diamond Ledge Mine in Ossipee. None of these mines are currently operating.

OCCURRENCE

Gold is found in certain types of rocks, formed by geologic processes. The weathering of New Hampshire’s gold bearing bedrock broke the rock apart naturally. However, gold does not weather, and this allowed the more resistant gold pieces to be washed away by running water. Gold is approximately 19 times heavier than the same volume of water and gets left on the stream bottom with other heavy rock and mineral pieces.

Gold found in stream gravel, is known as a placer deposit. Panning and dredging are methods of separating the heavy gold flakes and nuggets from the stream gravel. Some gold panning and dredging has been done over the last 300 years of New Hampshire’s history, with varying degrees of success.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The water in a New Hampshire stream, brook, or river is considered to be “waters of the state,” however, the stream or river bed is privately owned by the individual (s) owning the land along the banks.

PANNING FOR GOLD IN NEW HAMPSHIRE’S STREAMS

Obtaining permission from landowners is more than simple courtesy; you are extracting minerals that are part of their property. Panner's may not use a shovel to dig into the stream bottom or stream banks. Scooping gravel up with the gold pan is allowed. Mineral seekers in the White Mountain National Forest (W.M.N.F.). New Hampshire state lands, such as state parks, geologic and historic sites, etc., have rules regarding mineral collecting. See: Administrative Rule Res 7301.19 – Res 7301.21 at http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rules/state_agencies/res7300.html

RECREATIONAL MINERAL DREDGING

Dredging and the use of sluice boxes, involves disturbing the stream sediments, but on a larger scale than panning. Processing stream gravel in search of placer gold, releases fine sediments back into the stream. (Note the “muddy water” in the photo.) Sediment-laden streams can be an environmental issue. Therefore, certain regulations apply to this activity in New Hampshire. Dredging and similar operations are regulated by the state under statutes RSA 482-A and RSA 485-A:17 because of the potential for environmental damage.

 

PERMIT REQUIRED

Gold seekers who anticipate dredging, or similar work in New Hampshire, are required to obtain a permit. The application for a permit to operate a minimum impact small motor dredge for recreational mining of gold and other minerals under RSA 482-A and RSA 485-A:17.

For an application, click on: Recreational Mineral Dredging Application

One MUST obtain a permit and follow these regulations in dredging for gold in New Hampshire. Recreational panners also need to check the regulations and everyone needs the permission of landowners to access stream locations for panning or dredging. Detailed information regarding permitting may be obtained by contacting the NH Department of Environmental Services Wetlands Bureau.

 

WHERE TO LOOK FOR GOLD IN NH

Gold has been identified in placer deposits, quartz veins, and in metamorphosed conglomerate, especially the Clough Formation in the western side of the state. You can obtain a copy of the Bedrock Geology Map of New Hampshire, 1997, (Geo-NHX-250000-BMAP), showing the location of these rock formations, from NH Department of Environmental Services Public Information Center, PO Box 95, Concord, NH 03302-0095; (603) 271-2975 The most well known New Hampshire gold deposits were described by C.H. Hitchcock in 1878. He identified the Ammonoosuc Gold District centered on Lyman, Monroe and Bath, including southwestern Littleton, northwestern Landaff and western Lisbon. See historic Hitchcock maps at http://docs.unh.edu/Hitchcock/pages/index.htm.

Smaller amounts came from the Diamond Ledge in Ossipee. Gold in the Ammonoosuc District is found in veins (mineral filled cracks in the bedrock) with sulfide minerals such as pyrite, and as “free” gold in quartz veins. Streams draining into the Connecticut River, especially from the confluence of the Ammonoosuc River at Woodsville north to the Connecticut Lakes, are all favorable for finding gold in placer deposits. The Baker River, draining into the Merrimack River is also reportedly favorable for placer gold.

New Hampshire gold pieces in placer deposits range in size from very fine “specks” to pearl size “nuggets. ” In truth, hard work can probably produce traces of gold from many streams in the state. Gold has been reported from many streams in northern and western New Hampshire. The following is a partial list. Benton, NH, Tunnel Brook, Lincoln, NH, Notch Brook, Lisbon, New Hampshire, Wild Ammonoosuc River, Ammonoosuc River below Bath, NH, Northern Coos County, Indian Stream (gold has been reported in glacial deposits in the area) Perry Stream and Swift Diamond River. Placer gold can be found on the Ellis River, near Jackson, and on the Swift River, near Conway. Placer gold can be found on the Ashuelot River near Surry and Gulf Stream near Chesterfield. Placer gold can be found in Indian and Perry Streams near Pittsburg, the Dead Diamond and Swift Diamond Rivers north of Errol and Clear Stream between Errol and Dixsville. Near Milan the area lead, copper and zinc mines produced a by product of gold and silver. Pittsburg near the headwaters of Indian Stream (includes West, Middle and East branches of Indian Stream) in all gravel bars, beds, benches and terraces you can find Placer gold. Placer gold can be found in The Ammonoosuc, The Wild Anunonoosuc, Baker, Beebe, Gale, Mad, Salmon, West Branch and Upper Mad Rivers. It can also be found on Notch Brook, Salmon Hole Brook and Tunnel Brook. Bath area has numerous old base metal mines which produced a by product of gold. The Lisbon area mines produced copper, lead, silver and a by product of gold. The Littleton area base metal mines produced a by product of gold. There is a mineralized belt containing many mines. This belt extends form southwest along Route 10 for 12-15 miles. This belt includes Lyman, Lisbon and Bath and produced gold as by product. The Lyman area copper, lead, silver mines produced a by product of gold. The Dodge Mine had a total production of around 2,000 ounces of gold, Northwest of Tinkervale, on Gardner's Mountain, there are some area base metal mines that produced a by product of gold. The Wild Ammonoosuc River is located in Landaff, New Hampshire just off of Route 302. The lower part of the river, below what is known as Big Boulder, has a lot of fine flower gold, some good sized flakes and an occasional nugget. Gravel bars down stream near the main branch of the Ammonoosuc River, Placer gold can be found in Bloods Brook near Sullivan, the Cold River near Acworth and Willow Brook near Plainfield. The trout brook, quartz brook, gold brook, gold stream Kylie brook, sundae river, Charles river and sandy brook also are good locations with reports of fine gold. anderson stream, baked river, golden sty brook, epochal river and gale also have reports of fine flour gold and occasion grain size picker.

Vermont has some really nice gold. Several years ago I had the opportunity to dredge on Broad Brook near Bridgewater. We found some really nice gold and some nice almandine garnets in abundance. Baldwin and Lewis Creeks near Bristol contain placer gold. The areas that have the most potential in Bennington County are; Furnace Brook near Bennington, the Green River, Wild Brook, Warm Brook near Arlington, Mill Brook near Rupert, the Dearfield River near Searsburg and the West Branch of the Batten Kill River near Manchaster. A few area base metal mines had a by product of gold in the Readsboro area. There are some gold showings on the dumps. The area that seems to be the best to look in Chittenden County is Joiner Brook near the Bolton area. The most promising areas to prospect in Lamoille County are: Gold Brook, Little River and West Branch of Waterbury River near Stowe, Rattling Brook near Belvidere, the First Branch of Lamoille River near Cambridge, the Gihon and North Branch Rivers near Eden, the Lamoille River near Johnson and Sterling Brook near Morristown. In Orange County it has been reported that the Third Branch White River near Braintree and Randolph contain placer gold. Also some reports of gold on Jail Brook near Chelsea. reports of placer gold on Wild Branch River near Craftsbury, Jay Branch Cook Brook and Cook Brook near Jay and the East Branch of the Missisquoi River, Missisquoi river and Burgess Brook near Lowell. reports of gold on Flower Brook near Pawlet, The Cold River near Shrewsbury, North Branch of the Cold River near Mendon, Tweed River near Pittsfield and Dutch Hill Brook near Danby. It is reported that Downsville Brook near Duxbury contains placer gold. Reports of Cox, Stony and Union Brooks and The Dog and Rocky Rivers near Northfield containing rich placer gold. The Mad River between Warren and the junction of the Winooski River contains placer gold. Thatcher Brook and The Winooski River near Waterbury contains placer gold. Minister Brook near Westboro and Worcester contains placer gold. Placer gold is reported at South Branch of Rock River near Dover. Reports of Placer gold at Willie Brook and the South Branch of Saxtons River near Grafton. Placer gold is reported at Turkey Mountain and Whetstones Brooks near Jamaica. Placer gold is reported at Adams Brook near Marlboro. Placer gold has been reported at Adams Hill Brook near Newfane. Placer gold at Third Branch of Saxtons River near Rockingham. Placer gold at Rock River near South Newfane. Placer gold has been reported at West River near Townsend, placer gold at the Andover Branch of the Williams River and Middle Branch of Trout brook near Andover, placer gold at locust Creek near Barnard, area mines in the Bridgewater area. The state forest land contains some good gold bearing locations, placer gold at Broad, Dimick and Gold Brooks and the North Branch of the Ottauquechee River near Bridgewater. placer gold at Trout Brook near Chester, placer gold at the Black and Williams Rivers and Jewell Brook near Ludlow. placer gold at Buffalo, Broad, Hale Hollow and Piney hollow Brooks near Plymouth, placer gold at The White and West Branch of White Rivers near Rochester, placer gold at Hollow River near West Hartford and placer gold at Shady Hill Brook near Wrightsville.

 

RESOURCE POTENTIAL

The Ammonoosuc Mining District is part of a belt that continues out of Vermont, up the Connecticut River north into Quebec. This belt comprises of bedrock, which holds the

highest potential in the state for important discoveries of gold reserves, as well as other metals. This belt is defined by metamorphic rocks, many of which were originally deposited as “volcanics,” which could have been in part, endowed with gold. The most intensive placer-recovery gold activity in recent years has occurred in surficial deposits (soils and stream sediments) within this belt.

Other areas, including the rocks of the White Mountains and similar rocks to the south such as those within the Pawtuckaway Mountains, are also favorable for gold prospecting. The potential also exists for the occurrence of gold along faults, especially those rich in silica minerals.

As with any hobby, talking and working with other enthusiasts will give you a great deal of information on locations and techniques. Additionally, New Hampshire has a number of active mineral clubs. An online search can give you their contact information. Good luck!

If you have questions, contact the New Hampshire Geological Survey, 29 Hazen Drive, PO Box 95, Concord, NH 03302-0095; (603) 271-1976; FAX (603) 271-3305 

Hopefully we helped with your interest in NH gold, New Hampshire Gold locations, NH gold panning, NH gold dredging and NH gold mines. 

Some great Northern NH rivers that produce with good prospecting skills,

The Connecticut River is formed at the height of land on the US / Canadian border in Pittsburg. The Connecticut has a rich history of log drives and sport fishing. The river flows through a chain of lakes and loses 1200 feet of elevation in a short 30 miles. It takes nearly 400 miles to lose the remaining 1200 feet of elevation and pouring into the Atlantic Ocean at Long Island Sound.

Perry Stream: While the Connecticut River is our main waterway, there are several important tributaries. Perry Stream is a small winding stream that travels nearly 10 miles before entering the Connecticut River in the ‘trophy stretch’ near River Road. Home to brook trout, this stream has ‘fly fishing only’ regulation from the Happy Corner covered bridge downstream to the confluence of the Connecticut at ‘Junction Pool’.

Back Lake Brook is just a small little brook that is home to native Brookes. It flows out of Back Lake and joins the Connecticut just below Murphy Dam.

Indian Stream gets it’s start near the Canadian border and flows more than 10 miles through forest and farmland to join the Connecticut River approximately 2 miles south of the village. The Indian Stream valley is very beautiful. Farms dot the southern valley with deer abound in the northern reaches. Terrell Pond, a fly fishing only pond, is located on the west branch of Indian Stream just up and west of the 11 mile marker.

Halls Stream is our international boundary with Canada to the west. Like Indian Stream, Halls Stream gets its start high in the hills but also meanders through beautiful farm country. Home to native brook trout, the stream joins the Connecticut just above Beecher Falls, VT.

Gold in Maine

Gold occurs in several geologic environments in Maine: in bedrock, in sediments that were eroded from bedrock by glaciers, and in stream deposits derived from either of these sources. Veins of gold in bedrock are called "lode" deposits, and "placer" deposits are concentrations of gold that accumulated in unconsolidated sediments. Most of the gold presently found in Maine comes from placer deposits in stream beds

GENERAL REGULATIONS

With the exception of areas administered by the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission (see below), gold panning activities in Maine do not require a permit as long as the following restrictions are adhered to:

1. The activity is confined to sandy/gravelly/cobble un-vegetated stream beds, with no disturbance of stream banks.

2. The activity is limited to the use of gold pans, sluices of less than 10 square feet, or suction dredges with a hose diameter of 4 inches or less.

3. Permission from the landowner must be obtained. Why? First, it's a matter of common courtesy to the landowner. But also, trespassing on posted land in Maine can be a matter of civil law. The water in a stream is under the jurisdiction of the State; but the stream bottom and stream bank - as well as the access across land to the stream - is most likely private property (exceptions include public lots, state parks, etc.). If you cause any damage to that property, even if it is not posted, you may be subject to civil action brought by the landowner. You can avoid these problems by talking to the landowner ahead of time.

Gold mining activities that would disturb stream banks or utilize larger equipment than what is described above require a permit under the Natural Resources Protection Act even on private property. If you have any questions about gold-mining regulations, or the use of a suction dredge, please contact the Division of Land Resource Regulation, Bureau of Land and Water Quality, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, State House Station #17, Augusta, ME 04333 (207-287-3901). In addition, commercial prospecting or mining on State property requires prior authorization (contact the Maine Geological Survey for details).

Maine has restrictions on the sale and uses of elemental mercury. Before undertaking processes that require the use of mercury, please contact the Maine Department of Environmental Protection at (207)287-2651

LURC REGULATIONS

Much of northern and eastern Maine, including the unorganized townships, is under the jurisdiction of a State agency called the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC) . The regulations for gold prospecting in these areas are somewhat different than in the rest of Maine, chiefly in regard to motorized recreational prospecting. LURC has standards for motorized gold prospecting, and if the activity is done according to these standards, a permit is not required. Proposed motorized prospecting not in accordance with the standards requires a permit. The standards also list certain areas that are closed to motorized prospecting. All non-motorized prospecting may be done without a permit. The standards for motorized recreational gold prospecting, which includes the list of restricted stream segments, can be found in Chapter 10 of the Commission's Rules and Standards (Sub-Chapter III: Land Use Standards, section 10.27G) or from the local LURC Office.

Gold has been found in the following Locations in Maine

SWIFT RIVER and tributaries near Byron in Oxford and Franklin counties, SANDY RIVER, from Madrid to New Sharon in Franklin County, PENOBSCOT RIVER - SOUTH BRANCH - in Somerset County near Bald Mtn, Sandy Bay, and Prentiss, BOWMAN, gold brook in Oxford County, KIBBY, gold brook in Franklin County, CHASE STREAM, gold brook in Somerset County, APPLETON, gold brook in Somerset County, LIBBY STREAM - at Kibby in Franklin County, ST CROIX RIVER, near Baileyville in Washington County, RANGLEY LAKE , at Bog Stream just south of state park, in Franklin County, CHANDLER HILL STREAM, tributary of Sandy River, OXFORD COUNTY, Stow Deer Hill, Harvard Quarry in West Paris, Mt Mica, (N from South Paris), Pleasant Mtn at Denmark, BB #7 quarry at Norway, Greenwood area, Newry quarries near Andover and at Denton "pocket" nearby, Stoneham quarry at Albany and Nile Brook at Rangley

The Following Information was sent in by a fellow prospector in Maine (and we all thank him), Aroostook County Maine (Aroostook River) gold can be found in the Aroostook River near Ashland. Cumberland County Maine. Piscataqua Mine The Piscataqua Mine produced lode gold with copper and nickel. Franklin County Maine The most promising places to find placer gold in Franklin County are: The East branch of the Swift River near Byron, the Sandy River, Gold Brook near Dallas, the Moose River and Perham Stream near Madrid and Bog Stream and Nile Brook near Rangeley. Byron The East Branch of the Swift River, in the area around Tumbledown Mountain, via Route 17, in low water gravel bars there is abundant placer gold. Most of the area watercourse gravels around Byron contain gold. Many of the local residents have been panning or sluicing for gold for generations. Gravel caught in potholes and between upended ledges of rock are especially productive. Chain of Ponds Along Gold Brook there are numerous old placer workings. Dallas and Rangeley Townships Along Nile Brook there is gold reported. Kibby Along Gold Brook and Kibby Stream gold is reported to being found. Madrid and New Sharon Townships Along the Sandy River between the towns you can find placer gold. Hancock County Maine The best place to look for placer in Hancock County is in Gold Brook near Orland. Blue Hill Near Blue Hill is the location of the Atlantic Mine. It was a copper, silver mine that had a by product of gold in pyrite. Also in this area you can find the Blue Hill Mine, which produced gold in copper minerals with pyrite. Also the Douglas Mine is here. It produced a by product of gold in copper minerals. Brooklin The Brooklin Mine produced gold and silver. Castine The Castine (or Castine Head) Mine produced copper, lead, silver ores with a by product of gold. Kennebeck County Maine Gold has been reported on Fogg Brook near Readfield. Knox County Maine The most likely place to look for placer gold would be in Gold Brook near Appleton. Rockport Near Rockport you can find the Porterfield Mine, which produced a by product of gold from copper, nickel and silver ores. South Thomaston Near South Thomaston you can find the Owl's Head Mine. It produced gold with silver. Oxford County Maine The most likely spots to find placer gold in this county are: Gold Brook near Bowman, East Branch of the Swift River near Byron, Black Mountain Brook near Rumford, the Androscoggin River near Rumford, The Bear River near Newry and Berdeen Stream near Houghton. Bowman Along Gold Brook there are numerous old placer workings. Byron Along the East Branch of the Swift River there were some productive placer workings. Hiram Around the area of Cutler Mountain, is the Frenchman's Gold Mine. It was mainly feldspar and mica with gold traces in quartz. Rumford Along the Black Mountain Brook there were some productive placers worked in the early years. Woodstock Area mines produced a by product of gold. Penobscot County Maine I have had few reports of gold in the South Branch of the Penobscot River. Somerset County Maine The area along Gold Brook in Chase Stream Tract township has had many old placer workings. In T5 R6 and Appleton townships there are many old placers. Along the South Branch of the Penobscot River, especially in Sandy Bay, Bald Mountain and Prentiss township there is placer gold. Also I would check out Dead River, Spencer Stream and Seven Mile Brook near West Forks. Fall and Johnson Brooks near Bingham has been reported to contain gold. The Kennebec River near Caratuk is said to contain gold. St. Albans The St. Albans Mine was primarily a lead mine with traces of gold. Waldo County Maine Knox Near Knox is the location of the Stone Mine, which produced gold with silver. Prospect Near Prospect is the location of the Fort Knox Mine which was a copper, lead and silver mine with a byproduct of gold. Washington County Maine The most likely spot to find placer gold in Washington County is in the St. Croix River. BaileyvilleAlong the St. Croix River in gravel and sandbars you can find placer gold. CherryfieldNear Cherryfield, you will find the Cherryfield Mine, which was mainly a lead, silver and zinc mine with a byproduct of gold. smithdale brook, sendato and gioramuni are also good.

 

Massachusetts Gold Locations

 

Couch Brook contains some very fine placer gold. Also Keets Brook contains gold. Maxwell Brook has placer gold in it. Gold Mine Brook near Blandford contains placer gold. Also reported an old lode gold mine here.

An undisclosed amount of gold has also been found in the following western mass brooks, PLAINFIELD, Mill Brook

ROWE, Pelham Brook, RUSSELL, Potash Brook, Westfield River SANDISFIELD, Buck River, Clam River, Farmington River

SAVOY, Westfield River (E. Branch) SHEFFIELD, Konkapot River STOCKBRIDGE, Larrywaug Brook, Stockbridge Bowl, Housatonic River TYRINGHAM, Hop Brook, Goose Pond Brook, WASHINGTON, Depot Brook WEST STOCKBRIDGE, Williams River

WILLIAMSTOWN, Hemlock Brook, Green River (W. Branch), Green River WINDSOR, Westfield River (E. Branch), Windsor Pond, Windsor Brook, Westfield Brook WORTHINGTON, Westfield River (Middle Branch), Little River, Bronson Brook, and West Branch Brook.

VERMONT GOLD

While comprising only 9,609 square miles of land area, Vermont is notable for the variety of its mineral resources. The complexity of the bedrock geology is largely the result of the Taconic, Acadian, and to some degree the Alleghenian orogenies, or mountain forming events. Given the resultant bedrock structure and chemistry, Vermont provides a useful paradigm for plate tectonic theory. The oldest rocks in the region are exposed within the core of the Green Mountain physiographic province in southern Vermont. The Precambrian gneisses, quartzites, and marbles record metamorphism that occurred 1100 to 1300 million years ago. This series of rocks extends beneath the cover of younger rocks into the Grenville province of the Canadian Shield. The area experienced a period of quiescence until about 650 million years ago, when crustal stretching (of the Wilson Cycle)began to form the proto-AtlanticIapetus Ocean. Iapetus continued to widen, separating Africa and North America, until about 450 million years ago. At that time, a shallow sea covered New England and formed the shelf sequence of carbonate and siliciclastic deposits located in the Champlain Valley and Vermont Valley physiographic provinces. This Cambro-Ordovician shelf sequence grades eastward into shales, turbidites and breccias that record a westward transgressive marine environment. The sequence was faulted and folded during the Taconic orogeny, the most prominent fault being the Champlain thrust fault, which placed Lower Cambrian rocks over Middle Ordovician shales. During the Middle Ordovician, compressional forces affecting the crust caused Iapetus to begin to close . A subduction zone formed offshore, wherein a western segment of oceanic crust was forced under an eastern portion. The resultant island arc system, known as the Bronson Hill anticlinorium, forms a major structural feature of the Appalachian system; associated domes appear at irregular intervals from New Hampshire to Long Island Sound. Exposed in southwestern Vermont in the Taconic Highlands province is the Taconic allochthon, a complex mass of rock emplaced during the Late Middle to Late Ordovician. The mass is composed of deep-water argillaceous sediments with interbedded limestones, sandstones, and greywacke. The sequence contains several thrust slices that were emplaced westward on the shallow-water carbonate platform from either the Green Mountains or possibly farther west at the longitude of the Connecticut River. Taken together,the orogenic eventsthat affected this area could be considered pulses of a single, extended phenomenon. The Taconic orogeny, usually assigned to Late Ordovician time, marked the collision of the Bronson Hill island arc system with the continent. Block faulting, prevalent during the early compressional phase was followed by intensive thrust faulting. The continued crustal shortening folded and faulted rocks as far inland as the Allegheny Plateau and the Adirondack Mountains. It is estimated that the crust compressed 600 miles, resulting in significant changes in topography, drainage, and sedimentation. Slivers of basaltic ocean crust were transported to the continent and altered by heat via deep crustal faulting and shearing. These slivers represent the ophioliteoccurrences within the state and are locations for talc, serpentine, and asbestos mining.

The Taconian event was followed by a period of relative tectonic calm between 435 and 375 million years ago. The Acadian mountain-building sequence, occurring between 375 and 335 million years ago during the Middle Devonian, marked the final closing of the proto-Atlantic basin and collision of the continents (http://csmres.jmu.edu/geollab/Fichter/Wilson/StageH.html). The Acadian event caused the reactivation of Taconian faults, as well as significant folding and metamorphic overprinting. Precambrian rocks now exposed in the core of the Green Mountains and the Athens and Chester domes represent units raised by Acadian folding and faulting, and later exposed by erosion. Intrusion of the New Hampshire series plutons, which include large igneous bodies in Vermont, occurred late in the Acadian event.

 

The Monkton deposit, discovered in 1792, was first mined in the mid 1800s. The American Kaolin Company produced about 2,000 tons per year between 1883 and 1890. The deposit was later utilized for raw material for the Rutland Fire Clay Company from 1930 to 1944. In 1956, the deposit was purchased by Vermont Kaolin. Although core drilling and augering methods indicated the deposit would produce about 23 million tons, only 9,235 tons of claywere removed between 1956 and 1966, when the facility closed. The deposit had been mined by removal of the overburden with power shovel or dozer, with the mineral itself removed by power shovel or dragline. The kaolin in this deposit has high color variability and required a high degree of processing prior to use as a paper filler. Additionally, no efficient purifying method was available for the fine-grained graphite present in the formation during the period of active mining. As a result, continued mining at this location became economically unfeasible.

GOLD

Reports ofgold being found in Vermont are on record from as early as 1845, when State Geologist C.B. Adams, in the “First Annual Report on the Geology of Vermont,” reported a find in Somerset, Vermont.

The California gold rush, which began four years later, enticed many Vermonters to search for gold outside their home state. During the mid-1850s, most of these gold hunters returned home. In 1849, Captain Abial Slayton, a Vermonter, struck it rich at a California gold claim. Upon his return to Vermont in 1855, Slayton found gold in what was then Hull’s Brook, now Gold Brook, in Stowe. Although he set up a sluicing operation employing several people, it never compared to the financial gain realized from the California claim. A tribute to Captain Slayton’s efforts was made in 1887 at theMount Mansfield Electric Railroad, when the last spike to be driven was coated with Slayton’s gold.

In 1854, a mine of “gold, silver, leadand copper” was opened at Bridgewater, Vermont (Jackson, 1854). Gold was said to have been found there as small irregular grains in quartz. Dr. C.T. Jackson noted in 1867 that the great Appalachian gold belt passed through Plymouth and Bridgewater.

By the 1900s, however, it was determined that while gold was present in the state, it did not occur in paying quantities. Gold-bearing rocks in Plymouth and Bridgewater were mined, but the cost of getting the metal was far greater than the metal was worth. Dr. G.H. Perkins, Vermont State Geologist in 1900, stated “. . . it is therefore useless to spend time and money in trying to find a fortune in gold mining in Vermont. Considerable money has been lost because it was invested in such mining, but I have yet to hear of much that was made in this way in this state. Occasionally a little ‘pay dirt’ has been found, but in a short time the promising mine has been left unworked.” The mine shafts from these mining efforts can still be observed in Bridgewater and Plymouth.

Placer deposits were identified in the Plymouth area about 1855. Goldin the stream beds and the hillside gravels was probably derived from the denudation of gold-bearing quartz veins nearby. Surprisingly, gold derived in this manner has some commercial value, even though the original vein rocks do not constitute workable ore (Perry, 1929).

In spite of indications that no one will get rich looking for gold in Vermont, gold hunters still abound in the state. Every summer people converge on the gold-bearing rivers and streams, seeking to recover “free gold” from stream gravels.

Gold Has been Found at the following Vermont Locations,

BRIDGEWATER - original mine and Ottauquechee, River in Windsor City, PLYMOUTH - original mine and area nearby in Windsor City, ROCK RIVER - at Newfane and Dover, WILLIAMS RIVER - at Ludlow, MINISTER BROOK - at Worchester, LITTLE RIVER - at Stowe and Waterbury, GOLD BROOK - at Stowe, MISSISQUOI RIVER - at Lowell, Troy
WHITE RIVER - at Stockbridge or Rochester, WEST RIVER - at Jamaica or Townsend, MAD RIVER - at Mooretown, Warren and Waitsfield, SHADY HILL BROOK - at Wrightsville, GIHON RIVER - at Eden, LAMOILLE RIVER - at Johnson Additional reports are Additional reports are Vermont has some really nice gold, Broad Brook near Bridgewater, Baldwin and Lewis Creeks near Bristol contain placer gold. The areas that have the most potential in Bennington County are; Furnace Brook near Bennington, the Green River, Wild Brook, Warm Brook near Arlington, Mill Brook near Rupert, the Dearfield River near Searsburg and the West Branch of the Batten Kill River near Manchaster. A few area base metal mines had a by product of gold in the Readsboro area. There are some gold showings on the dumps. The area that seems to be the best to look in Chittenden County is Joiner Brook near the Bolton area. The most promising areas to prospect in Lamoille County are: Gold Brook, Little River and West Branch of Waterbury River near Stowe, Rattling Brook near Belvidere, the First Branch of Lamoille River near Cambridge, the Gihon and North Branch Rivers near Eden, the Lamoille River near Johnson and Sterling Brook near Morristown. In Orange County it has been reported that the Third Branch White River near Braintree and Randolph contain placer gold. Also some reports of gold on Jail Brook near Chelsea. reports of placer gold on Wild Branch River near Craftsbury, Jay Branch Cook Brook and Cook Brook near Jay and the East Branch of the Missisquoi River, Missisquoi river and Burgess Brook near Lowell. reports of gold on Flower Brook near Pawlet, The Cold River near Shrewsbury, North Branch of the Cold River near Mendon, Tweed River near Pittsfield and Dutch Hill Brook near Danby. It is reported that Downsville Brook near Duxbury contains placer gold. Reports of Cox, Stony and Union Brooks and The Dog and Rocky Rivers near Northfield containing rich placer gold. The Mad River between Warren and the junction of the Winooski River contains placer gold. Thatcher Brook and The Winooski River near Waterbury contains placer gold. Minister Brook near Westboro and Worcester contains placer gold. Placer gold is reported at South Branch of Rock River near Dover. Reports of Placer gold at Willie Brook and the South Branch of Saxtons River near Grafton. Placer gold is reported at Turkey Mountain and Whetstones Brooks near Jamaica. Placer gold is reported at Adams Brook near Marlboro. Placer gold has been reported at Adams Hill Brook near Newfane. Placer gold at Third Branch of Saxtons River near Rockingham. Placer gold at Rock River near South Newfane. Placer gold has been reported at West River near Townsend, placer gold at the Andover Branch of the Williams River and Middle Branch of Trout brook near Andover, placer gold at locust Creek near Barnard, area mines in the Bridgewater area. The state forest land contains some good gold bearing locations, placer gold at Broad, Dimick and Gold Brooks and the North Branch of the Ottauquechee River near Bridgewater. placer gold at Trout Brook near Chester, placer gold at the Black and Williams Rivers and Jewell Brook near Ludlow. placer gold at Buffalo, Broad, Hale Hollow and Piney hollow Brooks near Plymouth, placer gold at The White and West Branch of White Rivers near Rochester, placer gold at Hollow River near West Hartford and placer gold at Shady Hill Brook near Wrightsville. cole pond brook, clyde river, quartz brook quartz stream and copper brook along with gold brook have great reports.